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Hot Spots
Finding the fish is half the battle but where do you start? Let The Fisherman help narrow your search with the following hot spot reviews. Each honey hole is covered in detail to reveal the best seasons, times and tides for our most popular species. Maps, tips and insights from our expert fishing staff help pin-point the best of the action in your area so you'll be there with the right lures, bait and gear when the bite is ready to explode.



12TH MONTH STRIPERS

Are you looking for that December striped bass? Well here are some options in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut waters. Read more »

17 FATHOM BANK

Nestled on the upper west end of the Mud Hole, 17 Fathoms is always mentioned by the top captains throughout the year. Water depth runs from 94 feet down to a fairly obvious 102 feet (actual 17 fathoms) but the immediate surrounding area can vary in depth 104 to 114 feet, and even drop down to 128 feet just within a half mile or less to the east. Read more »

AXEL CARLSON REEF

Tied with Atlantic City Reef for size at 4 square miles, and one of the two oldest of the artificial bottom layouts, Axel Carlson Reef is second only to the Cape May Reef (4.5 square miles) for size. It is rife with structure, the majority of which is rock, and is a magnet for sea bass, fluke and blackfish. Read more »

BREEZY POINT JETTY

Breezy Point is the terminus of the Rockaway Peninsula. It consists predominantly of dune/beach shoreline terrain, with a rock jetty at the tip of the point that extends well outward into the ocean. This famous stretch of boulders is widely known as the Breezy Point Jetty. Although the jetty is part of Gateway National Recreation Area, Breezy Point is a tightly knit community that prefers to keep non-resident traffic to a minimum. Therefore make sure you keep the area cleaner than when you arrived and there should be no problems. There is a guard gate at the end of the road and unless you have four-wheel-drive and a permit, you will not be permitted on the beach. For anglers willing to hike roughly a half hour to the jetty, there is a “Commoner” parking lot where you can park and walk to the jetty. A permit is required for the parking lot, as well as for beach access which can easily be obtained at the Fort Tilden Visitor Center just down the block, or by calling 718-338-3338 for info on other National Park offices where parking and beach permits can be purchased, and to check on current access restrictions. Read more »

BUG LIGHT

For more than 135 years The Long Beach Bar Lighthouse, better known as Bug Light has steered sailors to safety from its location between Orient Harbor and Gardiner’s Bay, welcoming them to the protected waters of Peconic Bay. More importantly, the beacon warns navigators of the hazardous sandbar located along Long Beach Point. The name is derived from the metal framework foundation that created images from the horizon that makes the light look like a large bug, hence the name. Read more »

CLAY HEAD, BLOCK ISLAND, RICLAY HEAD, BLOCK ISLAND, RI

Located at the northeast corner of Block Island, Clay Head offers action from spring through fall on a variety of species. Read more »

CONNECTICUT’S TROUT PARKS

Looking for a place to fish on Opening Day? Why not give one of Connecticut’s 12 Trout Parks a try? Read more »

COXES LEDGE – NORTHERN SECTION

A look at some of the fishy structure contained within the northern confines of Coxes Ledge. Read more »

COXES LEDGE – SOUTHERN SECTION

With year-round cod action and summertime addition of shark, tuna and billfish, this is a highly-productive section of Southern New England. Read more »

DOG LUMP

A certain little spot packs a big bite in South Jersey. About 14 miles on a slight southeast course out of the Great Egg Inlet sits the Dog Lump, where the nautical contour lines elicit an uncanny resemblance to an actual dog—ears, nose, body, tail and all—but all those funny looking lines tell of drastic changes in water depths that attract late summer and early fall pelagics. Read more »

ENGLAND BANKS

Legend has it that the England Banks were named as such by early skiff fishermen who launched their boats from the crashing surf; as they rowed fastidiously to the grounds roughly 2 to 3 miles offshore, the distance to get there seemed like they “were rowing to England.” Read more »

EXECUTION ROCK

This spot can play host to some very good striped bass, bluefish and blackfish action throughout the spring summer and fall Read more »

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