Go To The Homepage
Features
Hot Spots Presented by Navionics
Finding the fish is half the battle but where do you start? Let The Fisherman help narrow your search with the following hot spot reviews. Each honey hole is covered in detail to reveal the best seasons, times and tides for our most popular species. Maps, tips and insights from our expert fishing staff help pin-point the best of the action in your area so you'll be there with the right lures, bait and gear when the bite is ready to explode.



DELAWARE BAY REEF

With 18 artificial reef sites deployed and maintained by the State of New Jersey, the Division of Fish and Wildlife decided on taking a calculated chance by constructing a new reef, not offshore like the rest of the Garden State’s artificial reefs, but number 19, the Delaware Bay Reef. Read more »

ELEPHANT’S TRUNK

As time passes, some old school hot spots get lost in the shuffle, but one in particular trumpets its loud, boisterous call to attract new anglers – the Elephant’s Trunk. Located between 40 to 47 miles from Cape May Inlet and Townsend’s Inlet, the Trunk is an expanse that covers a lot of ground from tip to east and west walls. The namesake is due to the fact the area on local charts resembles the proboscis of an elephant with mouth extended open as if to grab a peanut. Read more »

NARRAGANSETT’S ROCKY SHORELINE

The rocky shore of Narragansett comprises a series of striper hot spots that begin at Point Judith and continue northeast into the mouth of Narragansett Bay. Read more »

OAK BEACH SHORELINE

Stretching from the west side of the Robert Moses Bridge to the Sore Thumb Pocket along the northern shore of Fire Island Inlet, on the barrier island separating the Atlantic from Great South Bay, lies the sleepy community of Oak Beach. While most of this stretch is made up of private homes, there are several areas that provide good fishing access for shore bound anglers, including hard core surfcasters. Read more »

RAMPASTURE IN SHINNECOCK BAY

40° 50′ 38″ N / 72° 30′ 3″ W

“Go where the locals go,” and when the going gets tough, the locals head for a little known area called Rampasture, which often produces some exceptional fluke action when other local areas fail. Tucked into the northeast corner of Tiana Bay and west of the Ponquogue Bridge lies Rampasture. This pristine, shallow section of the bay shelters myriad baitfish when many other areas are void of baitfish. It is this bait supply that draws good numbers of fluke to the area from May through the end of the season. Read more »


THE SOUTHEAST CORNER, BLOCK ISLAND

Continuing our tour of Block Island’s fishy structure, the Southeast corner of the island offers great variety throughout the seasons. Read more »

12TH MONTH STRIPERS

Are you looking for that December striped bass? Well here are some options in Massachusetts, Rhode Island and Connecticut waters. Read more »

17 FATHOM BANK

Nestled on the upper west end of the Mud Hole, 17 Fathoms is always mentioned by the top captains throughout the year. Water depth runs from 94 feet down to a fairly obvious 102 feet (actual 17 fathoms) but the immediate surrounding area can vary in depth 104 to 114 feet, and even drop down to 128 feet just within a half mile or less to the east. Read more »

AXEL CARLSON REEF

Tied with Atlantic City Reef for size at 4 square miles, and one of the two oldest of the artificial bottom layouts, Axel Carlson Reef is second only to the Cape May Reef (4.5 square miles) for size. It is rife with structure, the majority of which is rock, and is a magnet for sea bass, fluke and blackfish. Read more »

BREEZY POINT JETTY

Breezy Point is the terminus of the Rockaway Peninsula. It consists predominantly of dune/beach shoreline terrain, with a rock jetty at the tip of the point that extends well outward into the ocean. This famous stretch of boulders is widely known as the Breezy Point Jetty. Read more »

BUG LIGHT

For more than 135 years The Long Beach Bar Lighthouse, better known as Bug Light has steered sailors to safety from its location between Orient Harbor and Gardiner’s Bay, welcoming them to the protected waters of Peconic Bay. More importantly, the beacon warns navigators of the hazardous sandbar located along Long Beach Point. The name is derived from the metal framework foundation that created images from the horizon that makes the light look like a large bug, hence the name. Read more »

CLAY HEAD, BLOCK ISLAND, RICLAY HEAD, BLOCK ISLAND, RI

Located at the northeast corner of Block Island, Clay Head offers action from spring through fall on a variety of species. Read more »